Facts & Figures

Population

Germany is the most populated country in Europe and Korea is the third most populated one in East Asia.

Republic of Korea
51.7
million
Germany
83.1
million

Both countries (2019)

Source: World Bank Database (2020)

GDP per capita

Korea and Germany are both high-income countries in international comparison.

Republic of Korea
31489
US$/capita
Germany
46208
US$/capita

Both countries (2019)

Source: World Bank Database (2020)

Total final energy consumption per capita

Taking into account the different population sizes, a different image of total final energy consumption results: In Germany total final energy consumption per capita is slightly below the IEA member average of 2.9 toe, while Korea notably exceeds it. Korea overtook Germany in per capita energy consumption in 2002.

Republic of Korea
4.5
toe
Germany
2.7
toe

Republic of Korea (2017) :

KEEI (2019): 2018 Energy Info. Korea. Korea Energy Economics Institute. Ulsan, checked on 07/12/2020.

Germany (2017):

IEA (2020): Germany 2020. Energy Policy Review.

Both countries: World Bank based on IEA (2020): Energy use. Available online at https://data.worldbank.org/indicator/EG.USE.PCAP.KG.OE?locations=DE-KR , checked on 9/23/2020.

Source: KEEI (2019), IEA (2020)

Energy intensity

Among the 37 OECD countries, Korea has the fifth highest energy intensity. Between 1990 and 2015, OECD countries on average managed to decrease energy intensity by 30%. While Germany reduced its energy intensity by 40%, Korea only decreased it by 13% within the same period. Korea’s 3rd Energy Master Plan from 2019 has set the target to decrease energy intensity by 38% by 2030 as compared to 2017.

Republic of Korea
6.76
TJ/PPP US$2015
Germany
3.31
TJ/PPP US$2015

Industry share of GDP

Germany and Korea are both highly industrialized countries with an export-oriented economy. The industrial sector (incl. construction) accounts for a major contribution to both countries’ GDP.

Republic of Korea
32.8 %
Germany
26.7 %

Both countries (2019):

https://data.worldbank.org/indicator/NV.IND.TOTL.ZS?end=2019&locations=DE-KR-OE&start=1990

Source: World Bank Database (2020)

Industry share in final energy consumption

Industry accounts for the highest share in final energy consumption in both countries. 

Republic of Korea
56 %
Germany
35 %

Both countries (2017):
IEA (2019): World Energy Balances 2019. International Energy Agency. Available online at https://iea.blob.core.windows.net/assets/fffa1b7d-b0c5-4e64-86aa5c9421832d73/WORLDBAL_Documentation.pdf

Source: IEA (2019)

Transport sector share in final energy consumption

Innovative vehicle technologies and alternative fuels are crucial to shift from fossil fuel based to more sustainable forms of transportation. Germany and Korea assign electric and hydrogen mobility great potential.

Republic of Korea
20 %
Germany
25 %

Both countries (2017):
IEA (2019): World Energy Balances 2019. International Energy Agency. Available online at https://iea.blob.core.windows.net/assets/fffa1b7d-b0c5-4e64-86aa5c9421832d73/WORLDBAL_Documentation.pdf

Source: IEA (2019)

Residential sector share in final energy consumption

Although energy intensity in the residential sector in Germany and Korea does not differ, the German residential sector’s share in final energy consumption is more than twice as high as that of Korea.

Republic of Korea
12 %
Germany
25 %

Both countries (2017):
IEA (2019): World Energy Balances 2019. International Energy Agency. Available online at https://iea.blob.core.windows.net/assets/fffa1b7d-b0c5-4e64-86aa5c9421832d73/WORLDBAL_Documentation.pdf

Source: IEA (2019)

Total primary energy supply

Both countries account for similar amounts of total primary energy supply. Germany supplied 2.3% and Korea 2.2% of world energy in 2018, making them the sixth-largest and the eighth-largest energy consumer. Both countries’ energy supply mix is still composed to a large share by fossil fuels: In 2018, Coal, gas and oil accounted for 78% of primary energy supply in Germany and for 85% in Korea.

Republic of Korea
289
Mtoe
Germany
302
Mtoe

Both countries (2018):

IEA (2019): World Energy Balances 2019. International Energy Agency. Available online at https://iea.blob.core.windows.net/assets/fffa1b7d-b0c5-4e64-86aa5c9421832d73/WORLDBAL_Documentation.pdf

BP (2019): BP Statistical Review of World Energy 2019. Available online at https://www.bp.com/en/global/corporate/energy-economics/statistical-review-of-world-energy.html

Source: IEA (2019)

 

Carbon Intensity

Germany and Korea account for comparable values of carbon intensity that indicates the amount of CO2 emissions associated with a unit of energy supply.

Republic of Korea Germany
55
tCO2/TJ
Germany
58
tCO2/TJ

Energy imports

Korea and Germany both depend on energy imports to satisfy their energy demand. Increasing the share of renewables in the energy mix and raising energy efficiency can contribute to achieving higher levels of energy self-sufficiency and increased energy security.

Republic of Korea
95 %
Germany
70 %
KR